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My Red Pill Trip

QWire
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It was Monday night, 17 April 2017, when I heard about the documentary The Red Pill. Its screening was cancelled at Sydney University, as well as at cinemas in Melbourne. (1) Why? Bullies threatened the venues. Third wave regressive feminists, (2) who hadn’t even seen the documentary claimed erroneously, that it promoted violence and misogyny.

 

If there are ideas, speakers or events you don’t agree with, then threaten, intimidate, disrupt venues, even attempt to kill speakers (3 &3a) and the event will most likely be cancelled.

 

 “Free speech for me but, not for thee”. (4)  

 

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What About Kosher?

QWire
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By Ralf Schumann - Whenever the discussion comes to halal certification, one moral relativist will throw in the red herring: "But what about kosher?!"
Yes,
what about kosher? Let's go and check the facts.

red_hering head.jpgToday your odds are 3 to 1 that the meat sold in Australia comes from an animal that died at the hands of a male Muslim, who slit the poor creature's throat while dedicating it to his Allah. Your chances with beef are 50:50, however, with chicken, lamb or goat it is now close to 100%. Most meat today comes from halal-certified abattoirs and usually remains unlabelled at point of sale. If you doubt the numbers, ask your butcher, or write to the Australian Meat Industry Council.

Now go shopping and try to buy some certified kosher meat at your local butcher or supermarket. Let me know how it went, please. This is usually the point where moral relativism collapses and the red herring reeks of hypocrisy: In reality there is no comparing the certification of kosher with halal.

What Hides Beneath Dark Veils

QWire
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By Debbie Robinson - Friday 22nd February 2013 at a function centre in Liverpool, New South Wales, a person wearing full body cover and a mesh over the face was refused entry to a Q Society event, organised by SkipnGirl Productions. The Honourable Geert Wilders MP was to deliver the keynote address on the day.

burqapolice.jpgThe identity, body shape and gender of the person were completely hidden under the black full body covering.  An elected member of the Dutch Parliament, Mr Wilders has lived in safe houses under 24/7 police protection since 2004.

This is a direct result of death threats by Islamic fundamentalists. It is on public record Wilders is critical of Islamic ideology and in favour of banning full-face coverings like the burqa in public areas. 

Another Islam-critical Dutch politician, Pim Fortuyn, had been shot dead in 2002; and the Islam-critical Dutch artist Theo van Gogh was murdered by an Islamic fundamentalist in 2004.  The Danish author and journalist Lars Hedegaard had just survived an armed assassination attempt on 5 February 2013. The assassin was of Middle Eastern appearance and Lars Hedegaard is an author and critic of Islam.

The Desert Of Islamization

QWire
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By Daniel Greenfield -- Wars are fought with steel and of words. To fight a thing, we have to understand what we are fighting and why. A blindness in words can kill as effectively as blindness on the battlefield. Words shape our world. In war, they define the nature of the conflict. sahara desert.jpg
That definition can be misleading. Often it's expedient. The real reasons for the last world war had very little to do with democracy. The current war does involve terrorism, but like fascism, it's incidental to the bigger picture. The United States would not have gone to war to ensure open elections in Germany. It hasn't been dragged into the dysfunctional politics and conflicts of the Muslim world because of terrorism. Tyranny and terrorism just sum up what we find least appealing about our enemies. But it's not why they are our enemies. They are our enemies because of territorial expansionism. The Ummah, like the Third Reich, is seeking "breathing room" to leave behind its social and economic problems with a program of regional and eventually world conquest. 

An Event Not to Be Missed

QWire
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Tareq Al-Suwaidan is a Kuwaiti entrepreneur, I...

Tareq Al-Suwaidan is a Kuwaiti entrepreneur, Islamic author and speaker, and a leader of the Kuwaiti Muslim Brotherhood. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

By Debbie Robinson

An event not to be missed took place on Saturday 9th June 2012, at Monash University, Robert Blackwood Hall. 'Human Appeal International-Australia' in co-operation with 'Gulf Innovation' presented Doctor Tareq Al Suwaidan.

Following an entry fee of ten dollars, we proceeded to the foyer after passing an open bar selling an assortment of beer wines and spirits, a paper sign pinned to the left side of the wall designated the men's prayer space.

Raised bottoms greeted us.

We chatted to each other and looked out of place with our hair uncovered, this together with the fact a man was with our group. Following some laughter at a risqué piece of artwork hanging opposite the men's prayer area, the time finally came for us to enter the auditorium. Told to sit separately, we explained we were not Muslim. The response, "The request has nothing to do with religion."

Our male friend decided to make his way to the male entrance, followed by a procession of women who wanted to sit with him. At this entrance a similar scenario, auditorium staff genuinely confused, allowed us to enter after another explanation about not being Muslim and wanting to sit together as a group.

Feeling safe and relaxed, we spied a large lady with colourful hijab and red face to match making her way toward us. Once more the request was made for us to sit separately. Our response, "No we wish to remain as a group. We are not Muslim. The event is open to the public and taking place in a university lecture hall. Segregated seating is not mentioned on the flyer. Please leave us alone." We pointed out we were guests and felt offended by the endless harassment.

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